Future Tense is a partnership between New America, Arizona State University and Slate magazine to explore emerging technologies and their transformative effects on society and public policy. Central to the partnership is a series of events that take in-depth, provocative looks at issues that, while little-understood today, will dramatically reshape the policy debates of the coming decade.

The Future of Reproduction

New America
Future Tense

And as the recent furor over Facebook and Apple’s proposal to offer to fund the freezing of their female employee’s eggs indicated, we’re far from settled about how emerging reproductive technologies will affect the way we live.

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in the news | July 18, 2014 | Future Tense

Net Neutrality a Key Battleground in Growing Fight over Encryption

Activists and tech companies fended off efforts in the U.S. in the 1990s to ban Internet encryption or give the government ways around it, but an even bigger battle over cryptography is brewing now, according to Sascha Meinrath, director of X-Lab, a digital civil-rights think tank launched earlier this year. One of the most contested issues in that battle will be net neutrality, Meinrath said.

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in the news | June 17, 2014 | Future Tense

Tim Wu Makes A Bid For Net Neutrality

The internet has revolutionized human connectivity, but can be described, most simply, as a public space. Which is why New York state residents ought to pay close attention to the net neutrality debate, and to Tim Wu’s recently-announced candidacy as lieutenant governor to Zephyr Teachout.

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in the news | June 04, 2014 | Future Tense

The Battle Over Private Search

Of all the news to come out of this week’s Apple Worldwide Developers Conference, one update went almost unnoticed: Apple is partnering with a small startup to make online searching more private. Is this a shot across the bow for Google? And what does it say about the future battle for user privacy?