The New America Fellows Program supports talented journalists, academics and other public policy analysts who offer a fresh and often unpredictable perspective on the major challenges facing our society.

Trust and Economic Growth in China

Fellows

Guests include Madeleine Lynn, Director of Communications at Carnegie Council; Evan Osnos, staff writer at The New Yorker; Hao Wu, fellow at the New America Foundation; William Kirby, professor at Harvard University; and Edward Chin, supporter of the Occupy Central Movement with Love and Peace in Hong Kong.

Books

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in the news | October 29, 2014 | Fellows

Yasuní, Ecuador

Levi Tillemann

The proof is in: Detailed report shows how U.S. Internet access monopolies punish rivals and catch innocent bystanders in the crossfire—legally.

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in the news | October 18, 2014 | Fellows

Obama's midterm dilemma

Julian Zelizer

“With Democrats still bullish about the gubernatorial races it seems they are redirecting his limited time away from Capitol Hill and toward the races for the state house around the nation,” said Princeton political historian Julian Zelizer.

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in the news | October 17, 2014 | Fellows

Google's PAC spends in search of political influence

Julian Zelizer

Some of the tech industry’s key legislative priorities, though, aren’t so widely popular, or even well-known to the general public. Those issues include raising the number of visas available for skilled foreign technology workers, said Princeton political historian Julian Zelizer.

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in the news | October 17, 2014 | Fellows

Incumbents can't catch a break as crises mount

Julian Zelizer

"Other midterms have taken place in chaotic times," said Julian Zelizer, a professor of history at Princeton University. "Right now this is a pretty bad one. There are, rationally, a lot of problems that the president and the country are confronting."